Jennifer Gremillion | DAVID SEIDLER ON THE KING’S SPEECH
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DAVID SEIDLER ON THE KING’S SPEECH

david-seidler-on-the-king's-speech

DAVID SEIDLER ON THE KING’S SPEECH

Dear Movie Goers,

I watched The King’s Speech (2011) and was touched by the relationship between King George VI (played by Colin Firth) of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and speech therapist (played by Geoffrey Rush). It won four Oscars, including Best Original Screenplay by David Seidler.

Oscar-winning screenwriter, David Seidler, paid a visit at the Great American PitchFest. I tuned into his writing process and behind the scenes.

David described The King’s Speech as someone who refused his destiny and took life into his own hands. The movie explored duty and bravery.

He encouraged, “When the first check comes in, don’t spend it. Don’t buy the fancy car, put the kids in private school, take the vacation. Put it in the bank.”

David shared…

The truth of your story and the truth of characters is important.

When you discover that resonance within you, you hit the resonance within an audience.

Once you reach critical mass, everything happens!

When he watched The King’s Speech for the first time, he cried because his voice was heard.

He enjoys relationships against an epic background.

He used the templates of Rocky and My Dinner with Andre for The King’s Speech.

When you write a script, find your rhythm because it’s a song. It’s your song!

Great believer of catharsis.

Take projects with a resonance.

You must know the end of your script before you start.

Know the industry. You must make money first. If you create art, then great.

Don’t need to be linear story but must have a beginning, middle and ending.

He enjoys writing a treatment first because he knows where he is going (even if that treatment isn’t seen by anyone else.)

There were around 200 rewrites on The King’s Speech.

When you write from an energy field, the story writes itself. You become more of a stenographer.

You don’t want to write yourself out and be depleted the next day.

Ernest Hemingway once said, “I had learned already never to empty the well of my writing, but always to stop when there was still something there in the deep part of the well, and let it refill at night from the springs that fed it.”

Thank you Oscar-winner screenwriter David Seidler for encouragement behind the scenes and refilling my well.

May you find your rhythm, voice, song. May you tap into that energy field of resonance. May you speak and write your truth.

With appreciation,
Jennifer

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